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Patient News

Prescription Requests Generated by Private Providers

Prescription Requests generated by Private Providers

Further to a recent decision made within our Primary Care Network (PCN), we will no longer be able to provide NHS prescriptions for medications advised by a private provider.

We understand that this will be disappointing and will likely cause upset.  Please could you contact your private clinic to arrange your ongoing prescriptions privately. 

If you would like to be transferred to the NHS to be re-assessed for NHS treatment within the same regime of priorities applicable to NHS patients please contact the surgery for a routine appointment.  We will then refer you into the appropriate clinic for confirmation of diagnosis and where medication is indicated the most appropriate treatment for you will be initiated or existing medications will be continued. 

Please be aware that the NHS will not be responsible for retrospective funding of earlier treatments where patients who have received private treatment then transfer to the NHS.

Prescription Requests generated by Private Providers

Further to a recent decision made within our Primary Care Network (PCN), we will no longer be able to provide NHS prescriptions for medications advised by a private provider.

We understand that this will be disappointing and will likely cause upset.  Please could you contact your private clinic to arrange your ongoing prescriptions privately. 

If you would like to be transferred to the NHS to be re-assessed for NHS treatment within the same regime of priorities applicable to NHS patients please contact the surgery for a routine appointment.  We will then refer you into the appropriate clinic for confirmation of diagnosis and where medication is indicated the most appropriate treatment for you will be initiated or existing medications will be continued. 

Please be aware that the NHS will not be responsible for retrospective funding of earlier treatments where patients who have received private treatment then transfer to the NHS.

4 Mar, 2024
23 Jan, 2024
Measles and Protection with the MMR Immunisation

MEASLES AND PROTECTION WITH THE MMR IMMUNISATION

 

Key facts

 

Measles is one of the most infectious viral diseases in humans, spread by coughs and sneezes.

It can lead to serious complications such as pneumonia,  encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) , blindness and deafness.  In addition, measles infection damages and suppresses the whole immune system. This means that people who have had measles are more likely to catch other infectious diseases. This effect can last for as much as three years. 

Anyone of any age can catch measles, and it’s particularly important for young adults to make sure they’ve had both doses of the MMR vaccine before they think about starting a family, as measles infection can harm the unborn baby. 

The vaccine is very effective. After 2 doses 99% of people will be protected against measles and rubella, and 88% against mumps, giving immunity for life. 

The first MMR dose is usually given at 12 months when the immune system responds best and the second at about 3 years 4 months.

However you can catch up on the jabs at any point, whether you are a child or an adult.

 

Currently vaccine rates are well below what is recommended and there is significant concern about the number of measles cases presenting to hospitals, particularly in children.   Children and young people who have missed the MMR vaccine are particularly at risk.

 

Measles usually starts with cold-like symptoms, red painful eyes and sensitivity to light, a high temperature, and greyish-white spots in the mouth and throat. A red-brown blotchy rash usually appears a few days later, spreading from behind the ears to the rest of the body. Rarely the symptoms can lead to serious complications. 

 

Why childhood immunisation is important

 

Immunisation prepares the body to fight serious infections that might happen in the future. Young babies are very vulnerable to infections, so they need to be protected as early as possible.

Your child needs several different vaccines to be fully protected, so it’s really important to complete their childhood immunisation programme.

 

 

MEASLES AND PROTECTION WITH THE MMR IMMUNISATION

 

Key facts

 

Measles is one of the most infectious viral diseases in humans, spread by coughs and sneezes.

It can lead to serious complications such as pneumonia,  encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) , blindness and deafness.  In addition, measles infection damages and suppresses the whole immune system. This means that people who have had measles are more likely to catch other infectious diseases. This effect can last for as much as three years. 

Anyone of any age can catch measles, and it’s particularly important for young adults to make sure they’ve had both doses of the MMR vaccine before they think about starting a family, as measles infection can harm the unborn baby. 

The vaccine is very effective. After 2 doses 99% of people will be protected against measles and rubella, and 88% against mumps, giving immunity for life. 

The first MMR dose is usually given at 12 months when the immune system responds best and the second at about 3 years 4 months.

However you can catch up on the jabs at any point, whether you are a child or an adult.

 

Currently vaccine rates are well below what is recommended and there is significant concern about the number of measles cases presenting to hospitals, particularly in children.   Children and young people who have missed the MMR vaccine are particularly at risk.

 

Measles usually starts with cold-like symptoms, red painful eyes and sensitivity to light, a high temperature, and greyish-white spots in the mouth and throat. A red-brown blotchy rash usually appears a few days later, spreading from behind the ears to the rest of the body. Rarely the symptoms can lead to serious complications. 

 

Why childhood immunisation is important

 

Immunisation prepares the body to fight serious infections that might happen in the future. Young babies are very vulnerable to infections, so they need to be protected as early as possible.

Your child needs several different vaccines to be fully protected, so it’s really important to complete their childhood immunisation programme.

 

 

Mental Health Clinic

Patients can self refer and book into Sacha's mental health clinic on a Thursday at the surgery

Patients can self refer and book into Sacha's mental health clinic on a Thursday at the surgery

Physiotherapist

Patients can self refer and book into Niall's physiotherapy clinic on a Tuesday at the surgery. 

Patients can self refer and book into Niall's physiotherapy clinic on a Tuesday at the surgery. 

Wellbeing Clinics

Patients can self refer and book to see Megan in her Wellbeing Clinics on a Wednesday and Friday.

Patients can self refer and book to see Megan in her Wellbeing Clinics on a Wednesday and Friday.

Health Visitors Team

Cotswold Villages Health Visiting Team 
Well Baby Clinic: every Wednesday 1pm – 2.30pm (by appointment only) then baby Lunchbox (for feeding advice) 2.30pm-3pm at Chipping Norton Hospital, Russell Way, Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, OX7 5FA 
Our telephone number for appointments only is: 01865 903937. 
Our website is Health Visiting - Oxford Health NHS Foundation TrustHealth Visiting Service 

If you have any concerns regarding your child, please contact Parentline on 07312263081 

Cotswold Villages Health Visiting Team 
Well Baby Clinic: every Wednesday 1pm – 2.30pm (by appointment only) then baby Lunchbox (for feeding advice) 2.30pm-3pm at Chipping Norton Hospital, Russell Way, Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, OX7 5FA 
Our telephone number for appointments only is: 01865 903937. 
Our website is Health Visiting - Oxford Health NHS Foundation TrustHealth Visiting Service 

If you have any concerns regarding your child, please contact Parentline on 07312263081 

We welcome Dr Natalie Mason who is our new GP
Ben our HCPC Registered Paramedic Practitioner

Ben is a prescribing paramedic and has previously worked in GP Practices.  Ben is thrilled to join our team here at Charlbury Medical Centre.  He has experience in telephone triage, aswell as in both face to face and telephone appointments.  Ben is  also  helping us with the remodelling  of our appointment system  in line with the new GP contract.

Ben is a prescribing paramedic and has previously worked in GP Practices.  Ben is thrilled to join our team here at Charlbury Medical Centre.  He has experience in telephone triage, aswell as in both face to face and telephone appointments.  Ben is  also  helping us with the remodelling  of our appointment system  in line with the new GP contract.

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NHS App: A More Secure and Reliable Way to Receive Messages from Your Surgery

Please click the link below to download the NHS App.

NHS App | www.nhs.uk

Please click the link below to download the NHS App.

NHS App | www.nhs.uk

18 Aug, 2023
Infection prevention control guidelines to remain in place

The highest priority for the NHS remains the safety of staff, patients and visitors. While COVID restrictions will end in many settings in England from 19 July, everyone accessing or visiting healthcare settings must continue to wear a face covering (unless they are exempt) and follow social distancing rules.

Public Health England’s infection prevention control guidelines and hospital visiting guidance are therefore set to remain in place for all staff and visitors and across all health services including hospitals, GP practices, dentists, optometrists and pharmacies to ensure patients and staff are protected.

Read the infection prevention control guidance for further details.

The highest priority for the NHS remains the safety of staff, patients and visitors. While COVID restrictions will end in many settings in England from 19 July, everyone accessing or visiting healthcare settings must continue to wear a face covering (unless they are exempt) and follow social distancing rules.

Public Health England’s infection prevention control guidelines and hospital visiting guidance are therefore set to remain in place for all staff and visitors and across all health services including hospitals, GP practices, dentists, optometrists and pharmacies to ensure patients and staff are protected.

Read the infection prevention control guidance for further details.

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Advice in your region: England | Scotland | Wales | Northern Ireland | Ireland Get the latest NHS information and advice about coronavirus (COVID-19). Check if you or your child has coronavirus symptoms Find out about the main symptoms of coronavirus and what to do if you have them. Self-isolation and treatment if you have coronavirus symptoms Advice about staying at home (self-isolation) and treatment for you and anyone you live with. Testing and tracing Information about testing for coronavirus and what to do if you're contacted by the NHS Test and Trace service. People at high risk Advice for people at higher risk from coronavirus, including older people, people with health conditions and pregnant women. Social distancing and changes to everyday life Advice about avoiding close contact with other people (social distancing), looking after your wellbeing and using the NHS and other services during coronavirus. GOV.UK: coronavirus – guidance and support Government information and advice.

Advice in your region: England | Scotland | Wales | Northern Ireland | Ireland Get the latest NHS information and advice about coronavirus (COVID-19). Check if you or your child has coronavirus symptoms Find out about the main symptoms of coronavirus and what to do if you have them. Self-isolation and treatment if you have coronavirus symptoms Advice about staying at home (self-isolation) and treatment for you and anyone you live with. Testing and tracing Information about testing for coronavirus and what to do if you're contacted by the NHS Test and Trace service. People at high risk Advice for people at higher risk from coronavirus, including older people, people with health conditions and pregnant women. Social distancing and changes to everyday life Advice about avoiding close contact with other people (social distancing), looking after your wellbeing and using the NHS and other services during coronavirus. GOV.UK: coronavirus – guidance and support Government information and advice.

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